Saturday, November 1, 2014

Eagle Scouts collect 600+ pairs of shoes, build shed to support foster children

2014-06-02

By Staff Reports

The capabilities of an Eagle Scout should never be underestimated. Conner Chewning, 16, of Peachtree City, and Andrew Aycock, 16, of Fayetteville, recently completed their Eagle Scout projects for Bloom, a local non-profit organization that provides safe refuge and supportive services to foster children in Georgia. Chewning built a storage shed to store Bloom’s daily clothing donations, and Aycock collected more than 600 pairs of donated shoes. Both Eagle Scouts’ efforts resulted in valuable, timesaving solutions to help Bloom provide resources and shelter to foster children in Georgia.
Connor Chewning, with help from his fellow Eagle Scouts, built a 120 squarefoot free-standing shed for Bloom to store and organize the donations that accumulate for The Bloom Closet, Bloom’s free clothing resource center for foster children. The Bloom Closet, currently located inside Bloom’s corporate office building, was in desperate need of a separate storage facility to hold clothing donations until they could be processed and distributed to foster children in need.
When asked about he chose the Bloom storage shed as his project, Chewning remarked, “My family has always had a heart for children in foster care and has impressed upon me the importance of helping the youth in our community, so The Bloom Closet shed was a project I was truly interested in.” Chewning dedicated the completed building to Bloom on May 17, 2014.
While Chewning was busy hitting nail heads, Andrew Aycock was hitting the streets collecting donations of new and gently used shoes to donate to The Bloom Closet. Over the course of several weeks, he accumulated more than 600 pairs of shoes, which he delivered to Bloom just in time for summer and back-to-school foster family requests. Donations came from local churches, and businesses, in addition to Aycock’s teachers, fellow students, and friends.
“I was aware of Bloom’s mission, so I contacted them to see what their greatest need might be,” said Aycock. “Shoes. We always are in need of shoes, I was told. So I thought a shoe drive would be a great way to stock The Bloom Closet and help others feel the love and support of the community.”
“I dropped off big donation boxes at Prince of Peace Church, Fayetteville First United Methodist, and Inman United Methodist,” Aycock commented when asked about his collection strategy. “I also stood outside Smith & Davis where I explained the cause and asked shoppers for shoe donations.”
 To learn more about Bloom and inquire about potential volunteer opportunities, please call 770-461-7020, or visit www.bloomouryouth.org.
While Chewning was busy hitting nail heads, Andrew Aycock was hitting the streets collecting donations of new and gently used shoes to donate to The Bloom Closet. Over the course of several weeks, he accumulated more than 600 pairs of shoes, which he delivered to Bloom just in time for summer and back-to-school foster family requests. Donations came from local churches, and businesses, in addition to Aycock’s teachers, fellow students, and friends.
“I was aware of Bloom’s mission, so I contacted them to see what their greatest need might be,” said Aycock. “Shoes. We always are in need of shoes, I was told. So I thought a shoe drive would be a great way to stock The Bloom Closet and help others feel the love and support of the community.”
“I dropped off big donation boxes at Prince of Peace Church, Fayetteville First United Methodist, and Inman United Methodist,” Aycock commented when asked about his collection strategy. “I also stood outside Smith & Davis where I explained the cause and asked shoppers for shoe donations.”
 To learn more about Bloom and inquire about potential volunteer opportunities, please call 770-461-7020, or visit www.bloomouryouth.org.

 

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